CO 18-1-710. Affirmative defense

State: Colorado

 

Colorado Revised (C.R.S.) (2016)

Title 18.  Criminal Code

Article 1. Provisions Applicable to Offenses Generally

Part 7. Justification and Exemptions from Criminal Responsibility

18-1-710. Affirmative defense 

The issues of justification or exemption from criminal liability under sections 18-1-701 to 18-1-709 are affirmative defenses.

HISTORY: Source: L. 71: R&RE, p. 412, § 1. C.R.S. 1963: § 40-1-810.

Cross references: For the affirmative defense of impaired mental condition, see § § 16-8-103.5 and 18-1-803; for other provisions concerning affirmative defenses generally, see § § 18-1-407 and 18-1-805; for affirmative defenses to particular crimes, see specific criminal provisions in articles 2 to 18 of this title.

ANNOTATION

Law reviews. For article, “Self-Defense in Colorado”, see 24 Colo. Law. 2717 (1995).

If evidence is intended to show entrapment, it should be presented in defendant’s case-in-chief, since entrapment is an affirmative defense. People v. McKay, 191 Colo. 381, 553 P.2d 380 (1976).

Heat of passion is not an affirmative defense to first-degree or second-degree murder and no jury instruction regarding heat of passion needs to be given. People v. Carrier, 791 P.2d 1204 (Colo. App. 1989).

Applied in Bailey v. People, 630 P.2d 1062 (Colo. 1981); People v. Rex, 636 P.2d 1282 (Colo. App. 1981).